Entry Table | Part 4 – Finished!

A big issue throughout this project has been how to enclose the top, to cover the fuse box on the wall of our house. Initially I had considered using one of our bathroom mirrors, framed as a door, for my wife to use as a noticeboard in her calligraphy style. But, this did not work out, she wasn’t so excited about the idea!

Anyway, previous posts on this project are as follows:

Steps 1 to 9 can be seen here: http://woodworking.david-moody.info/entry-table-part-1/

Steps 10 to 13 can be seen here: http://woodworking.david-moody.info/entry-table-part-2/

Steps 14 to 20 can be seen here: http://david-moody.info/woodworkingadventures/2018/07/07/entry-table-part-3/

Anyway…

Step 21:  I had brought home, some time ago, the old partially rotten, backdoor from church. I had thought that maybe the decorative panels might be recyclable for making dinner trays, or something that my wife could paint or write on at least. Guess what, she did, while I wasn’t looking! I had decided to use the top two panels for sake of practicality, but she had written on the second pair down, so that was decision made, and I proceeded with measuring and cutting. As you can see from the picture on the right I measure so that part of the main frames in the doors would be cut so that they would become the door frames.

Step 22:  Cutting out the doors, with their frames, was a very practical idea, it gave me ready-made doors, but not without a small hassle, they fell apart! I kind of expected this, by cutting the frames so narrow I had cut them inside the jointing of the original door. Some glue and clamping resolved that very small issue. After the glue had dried I stained the doors. By the way, the day before I had already applied the first coat of Beger Petrocarpus Semi-Gloss stain.

Step 23:  I did the usual preparation for inserting door hinges, and attached the doors. This wasn’t plain sailing, some extra planing along the inside facing edges of the doors was needed to ensure a clean fit.

Step 23:  Finally, the entire cabinet was lightly sanded back where needed, and a second coat of stain applied.

I still have more of the door leftover for future projects, maybe a new sideboard to replace the old flatpack cabinet we currently have. The next project???

We love it!

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